Fifth Avenue Hawks

The three fledglings and their parents are doing very well, with them still staying around 72nd Street and Fifth Avenue.  They were all flying around when I was there for about an hour this evening.

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Tompkins Square Park Fliers

Both the adopted fledgling and the biological fledgling are starting to feel at home flying around the park and exploring the ground too.  This evening it was one happy family with the adult male feeding both youngsters.  It should be a fun summer.

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Tompkins Square Park Foster Child Adopted

The Tompkins Square Park foster child has been fully adopted by the parents in the park.  They're feeding it at least twice a day.  It however seems a little overwhelmed by the park and is still a little reticent to fly around.  It's preferring to branch around a tree rather than fly just yet. I'm sure this will work itself out over the next few days.

Thanks to the Horvaths for giving this youngster a chance to be a wild animal again.  Nothing is without risk, but giving this bird a chance to live a natural life is fantastic.

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Tompkins Square Park Foster Child

The Tompkins Square Park foster child finally decided to leave it's tree.  It first went to a fence and then spent much of the afternoon exploring the main lawn of the park.

The fact that it wasn't eager to fly back up into a tree had a few folks overly concerned.  The parents had already fed the new bird twice since it arrived.  Fledglings are like toddlers and can do silly things.  The right folks were keeping track of the bird, and everyone who needed it had the phone number of both parks employees and the rehabbers. 

Releasing a bird back isn't without risk but rescued eyasses deserve to be given a chance to be wild again.  I learned a long time ago not to second guess an established, trusted rehabber.

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Washington Square Park

Today, I after a good deal of searching I was able to find the fledgling and the adults.  My first sighting was a parent going west off of the student center towards Washington Square West.  Then after about ten minutes both adults were on top of an apartment building on the NW corner of the park.  It's unusual to see them together at this spot, so I hoped the fledgling was nearby.  One of the parents kept flying to a building on the SW corner of the park, so I guessed the fledgling was on one of the western buildings.  But I couldn't find it, but could hear Blue Jays from the park.  So I went out to Sixth Avenue and from in front of the IFC movie theater could see the fledgling on a railing of the SW building on the park.  It was foggy, so the photographs aren't great.  But I felt like I had been a great detective to find the fledgling!

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